Derby School War Memorial – Remembering the Fallen

Derby School War Memorial – Remembering the Fallen

By scrolling the images below you will find details about some of the fallen on our memorial situated at St. Helen’s House. 

The post gives further information about some of the names on the memorial and also images of their gravestones in the various cemeteries in Derby and further afield.

These images have been reproduced here by courtesy of Derbyshire War Memorials and Flickr.

To head over to Flickr use the following link: https://flic.kr/s/aHsmyofPPW

 

Derby School
Annual Cricket Match

Annual Cricket Match

The annual cricket match between Derby Grammar School and the Old Derbeians took place on Sunday May 26 at Hilton Cricket Club.

The Old Derbeians gathered from across the UK, called together by their captain Ananth Srinivasan.

Top scorers for the Old Derbeians were Jack Smith (82) and the captain, Ananth (48). For the DGS side, top scorers were Toby Ganley (47) and Varchas Swamy (28). The Old Derbeians won with a score of 184.

Barrie Sheard, Archivist with the Old Derbeians, presented the Alan Sanders trophy to ODS ​captain, Ananth. He thanked everyone for turning out and said: “Another year of great cricket – thank you to everyone for turning out. It has been good to catch up, good fun and good cricket. I award man of the match to Jack Smith, and on the school side must mention Toby Ganley who put in great performance.”

We will announce the date of the 2020 match soon.

Derby School After WW2

Derby School after World War 2

An article submitted by Alan Hancock (1946-1953)

This article was the winning entry on the latest website competition.

I entered Derby School in 1946 and left, to take up National Service in the Royal Navy before going on to university, in 1953. Looking back after more than 70 years, I appreciate what a momentous period of social and political upheaval that was. In 1946, I had little idea. But I believe that I understood, even then, that I was in a very unusual and progressive school, with an eclectic mix of staff driven by the post-war fervour.

The teaching was effective, and some of it inspired, but what I remember best is not what went on in the classrooms, but more the extra-curricular life. At least, that is what exercised the greatest influence on my future.  I could cite the school plays (I appeared in two major productions, of St. Joan and Murder in the Cathedral) or the musical tradition (I played violin, abominably, in the school orchestra, my voice broke during a performance of Messiah and I made a few attempts at composition). But the school trips abroad were probably the most influential part of my school life – they were responsible for a lifetime of international work and travel. And in retrospect, they must have been quite unusual at that time, taking young students into a Europe which was still trying to recover from the devastation of a world war.

The first trip for me was an exchange visit to Grenoble in the French Alps, when I believe I was twelve. It was my first trip abroad, and made even more exciting by our stopover for a single night in Paris (and a first taste of an illicit glass of cider). Our placements in Grenoble were eccentric: one of our party spent his time in a chateau, complete with servants, while another was taken to the local market each morning to help the family sell shoes. My friend and I were lodged together in a bourgeois apartment in the centre of the city, with weekend sorties into the Alps (where we ‘helped’ to hunt wild boar). We were rather poorly matched with two brothers who were much older, and who created a sensation when we returned together to Derby (they were both good looking, and one of them, on the wilder side, hooked up during his stay with a girl working in Woolworths).

The second trip was also an exchange, with Bruhl, a small town south of Cologne dominated by a lignite mine and notable mainly for its native painter Max Ernst.  There we spent a week or so in a local school, which was an enlightening insight into the culture of a German high school (especially the raucous end-of-year celebrations).  We must have been very early young visitors to Germany after the war, though we weren’t particularly aware of it.

The third and final school trip was to the small town of Pont Croix, close to the wild peninsula of the Pointe du Raz in Western Brittany. This was not an exchange visit: we stayed in some kind of boarding school or convent and lived (in my unreliable memory) on artichokes. We must have developed curiously accented French, as this was largely a Breton-speaking region. My most vivid image though is quite different. The toilet facilities were primitive, and we used an outside latrine, without running water. I kept my identity card and paper money (what there was of it) in my trouser pocket, and on one occasion, they slipped out of their moorings and dropped into the latrine. One of the staff heroically volunteered to be held by his legs and lowered into the pit to retrieve my funds and identification, something clearly beyond the call of duty (let alone sense). He was successful, and my money was laid out to dry on the grass, though it – and my identity card- were best located through a sense of smell for the rest of the holiday.

For me, there was one other memorable trip to come – also thanks to the interest and tutelage of Mr (WOB) Butler, geography teacher. I was not studying geography, but that did not deter him from tutoring me in writing an essay for a competition organised by the (then Overseas League), on the intimidating theme of demographic problems in the British Commonwealth. Possibly because I was younger than the other competitors, I was awarded third prize, which took me on a month’s study tour to Cyprus at a time when the island was not yet divided, but when nationalistic pressures were already visible, even to a young student.  I was not then politically aware, but the island itself was a joy – full of exotic Mediterranean landscapes that I had never seen before and a culture (and a cuisine) far removed from Derby. To cap it all, I experienced my first flights, and stopped off in Rome and Athens for a couple of days on the way. I even had the excitement of being delayed in Athens on my return journey (and the additional excitement of sending a telegram to warn my parents, ending up on a return flight abroad the new Comet aircraft. That created a thirst for travel which led to a professional lifetime of living and working abroad in an international arena. Without my time at Derby School, I imagine that my life would have been very different, and much poorer.

An Assembly of Celebrations

An Assembly of Celebrations

Derby Grammar School’s final whole-school assembly before the GCSE and A-Level examinations begin focused on celebration this morning.

We were delighted to be joined by Gil Bowles and Sarah Crane from YMCA Derbyshire who presented us a huge cheque for the Tanzania Project.

The relationship between the YMCA and the school has developed over the years and this year, as well as their annual cake sale to raise funds for the Tanzania Project, the organisation wanted to donate back to us part of the funds raised by the DGS staff team who took part in the SleepEasy event in March.

A team of five staff braved the wind and rain to sleep out for the evening, raising over £2000 and contributing to the fantastic £55,320 raised by the SleepEasy event. This morning a cheque for £1066 was presented to the Tanzania project leads Mrs. Sly and Mrs. Charnock.

On receiving the cheque Mrs. Sly said: “We are truly humbled that the YMCA as a charitable organisation itself, and for whom fundraising is so vital, can make this gift to our Tanzania Project charity. Thank you, this will make a huge difference to the children at Gedeli B school.”

The focus then changed to the inauguration of our Year 13 students, who are shortly to begin their A Level examinations, into the Old Derbeian Society (ODS).

Ralph Holden, President of the ODS, addressed the school saying how honoured he was to present each one of them with a gift which symbolises them leaving school and joining the society.

The ODS exists to ensure Derby Grammar School ex-pupils can retain and rekindle friendships, and it keeps the link with the school in perpetuity. All ODS members are life members.

Miss Stebbings, Head of Sixth Form, finished the assembly by wishing Year 13 well in the coming months and in their careers. She said: “I wish you success, that you strive for the things that you want and, most of all, that you are happy.”

COMPETITION WINNER ANNOUNCED

COMPETITION WINNER ANNOUNCED

Following the terrific success of the School Memories Competition, we have now selected the winner as Alan Hancock OD (1946-1953) for his submission entitled Derby School After WW2
We will shortly be posting this article on the site, subject to Alan’s permission, for all to read. We will also be serialising some great work by Martin Holmes OD (1940-1947) in the very near future.
Congratulations to Alan and our thanks to all who entered the competition.
Ogston Sailing –  Club Open Day

Ogston Sailing – Club Open Day

The Management Board of the Ogston Sailing Club (On the actual site of the Amber Valley Camp at Woolley Moor) have sent us a special invitation to attend this year’s SPECIAL OPEN DAY ON MONDAY SPRING BANK HOLIDAY 6TH MAY 2019. Inviting all Old Derbeians both young and old are cordially invited to join them on this special day at their Clubhouse. Even trips out onto the reservoir are possible. 
Please note our own Archivist Barrie Sheard will be attending and it would be oh so great if you and/or your wife, partner or family or friend could make the trip.
Annual Dinner – 2019

Annual Dinner – 2019

The Society Annual Dinner 2019 will be held at the Grange Banqueting Suite Littleover, Derby on Saturday 22nd June 2019
This is a change from the traditional timing of November, allowing more recent Old Derbeian members and others, the opportunity to be present.
We are also opening the dinner invitation to guests of members, school staff and parents of current school students, to make the event a more inclusive affair.
Plans are in hand for the school Jazz Band to be present as well as the Barber Shop Choir, who will be back by popular request. The reception will hopefully, weather permitting, be on the terrace on what we hope will be a super midsummers night.
Tickets have been set at £30 per head so no increase on last year!

The Dinner Application Form can be accessed here:

http://www.oldderbeians.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Annual-Dinner-Response-2019.pdf

Please try and book a table for you and  your guests. If you require further information please contact us at the following email address.
dinner@oldderbeians.co.uk
We look forward to seeing you and your guests at the event
Class of 1950 Reunion – March 2019

Class of 1950 Reunion – March 2019

Class of 1950 reunion held at The Five Lamps on Tuesday 26th March 2019
The run up to this meeting saw the sad deaths of David Owen (January) and Allan Squires (March) and these inevitably cast a bit of a cloud on our meeting. However on the upside, attendance was more buoyant than expected – with fourteen of us making the meeting (That is 13 from the class of 1950 plus Barrie Sheard – our adopted friend and the OD Archivist.)
 
As usual, the meeting was totally informal, but overall we all enjoyed almost 2.5 hours of good conversation accompanied by some excellent food and drink. We received greetings and good wishes from six of our number who were unable to join us: John Bishop; John Dring; Tony Holmes; David Hughes and John Williams. John was due to have a heart operation last week-end so we trust he is now well on the way to recovery. Geoff Neaum was planning to attend, but a neighbour needed an urgent trip to hospital.
We were delighted to welcome Neville back to this meeting since he managed to miss both last year because he was out of the country – he brought an interesting report of his trip down the Mississippi River – and came in his pre-war Austin Seven motor – which caused considerable interest in the car-park! A particular feature of this meeting was the amount of memorabilia that were brought for interest and for inclusion in the OD archives. Barrie was delighted and almost overwhelmed.
 
Please put the date of the next meeting in your diary same time, same place on Tuesday September 17th. Hopefully a goodly number of us will be able to make it this time.

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